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POETRY
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Dorothy Parker   Kahlil Gibran   Omar Khayyam   Shakespeare    ee cummings

 

Desiderata
Wise Words
Love Letters
Love Quotes
Beauty Quotes
Gandhi Quotes
Einstein Quotes
Mark Twain Quotes
Franklin's 13 Virtues
Five Minutes for Peace
The Hundredth Monkey
D.H.Lawrence "The Rainbow" 

Kahlil Gibran
"On Love"
"On Beauty"
"On Work"
"On Giving"
"On Children"
"On Freedom"
"On Friendship"

"On Crime & Punishment"
and Song of Love

San Francisco Art & Poetry Events

such was a poet and shall be and is
--who'll solve the depths of horror to defend
a sunbeam`s architecture with his life:
to hold a mountain`s heartbeat in his hand.


"when god decided to invent
everything he took one
breath bigger than a circustent
and everything began
when man decided to destroy
himself he picked the was
of shall and finding only why
smashed it into because"


O sweet spontaneous
earth how often have
the
doting
fingers of
prurient philosophers pinched
and
poked
thee,
has the naughty thumb
of science prodded
thy beauty, how
often have religions taken
thee upon their scraggy knees
squeezing and
buffeting thee that thou mightest conceive
gods
(but true
to the incomparable
couch of death thy
rhythmic
lover
thou answerest
them
only with

Spring


from spiralling ecstatically this
proud nowhere of earth’s most prodigious night
blossoms a newborn babe:around him,eyes
--gifted with every keener appetite
than mere unmiracle can quite appease—
humbly in their imagined bodies kneel
(over time space doom dream while floats the whole

perhapsless mystery of paradise)

mind without soul may blast some universe
to might have been,and stop ten thousand stars
but not one heartbeat of this child;not shall
even prevail a million questionings
against the silence of his mother’s smile

--whose only secret all creation sings


"next to of course god america i
love you land of the pi

lgrims' and so forth oh
say can you see by the dawn's early my
country tis of centuries come and go
and are no more what of it we should worry
in every language even deafanddumb
thy sons acclaim your glorious name by gorry
by jingo by gee by gosh by gum
why talk of beauty what could be more beaut-
iful than these heroic happy dead
who rushed like lions to the roaring slaughter
they did not stop to think they died instead
then shall the voice of liberty be mute?"

He spoke. And drank rapidly a glass of water


love is a place
& through this place of
love
move
(with the brightness of peace)
all places
yes is a world of
& in this world of
yes live
(skillfully curled)
all worlds
~ e.e. cummings

e.e.cummings
more e.e.cummings Love Poems

recommended books
five stars
Dreams in the Mirror:A Biography of E.E. Cummings

by Richard S. Kennedy
E.E. Cummings: Complete Poems 1904-1962
100 Selected Poems

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Once, when I was young and true,
Someone left me sad-
Broke my brittle heart in two;
And that is very bad.
Love is for unlucky folk,
Love is but a curse.
Once there was a heart I broke;
And that, I think, is worse.


" Some men break your heart in two,
Some men fawn and flatter,
Some men never look at you;
And that clears up the matter."

Dorothy Parker Society

recommended book
five stars
Portable Dorothy Parker

by Dorothy Parker

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All these things have you said of Beauty
Yet in truth you spoke not of her but of needs unsatisfied
And beauty is not a need but an ecstasy.
It is not a mouth thirsting nor an empty hand stretched forth,
But rather a heart enflamed and a soul enchanted.
It is not the image you would see nor the song you would hear,
But rather an image you see though you close your eyes
and a song you hear though you shut your ears."


"The earth is like a beautiful bride who needs no man-made jewels
to heighten her loveliness but is content with the green verture
of her fields, the golden sands of her seashores and
the precious stones of her mountains."


" Your hearts know in silence the secrets
of the days and nights;
But your ears thirst for the sound of
your hearts knowledge.
You would know in words that which
you have always known in thought.
You would touch with your fingers the
naked body of your dreams."


"How generous you are, Earth,
and how strong is your yearning for your children
lost between that which they have attained and that
which they could not obtain.
We clamor and you smile; we flit but you stay!
We extract your elements to make cannons and bombs,
but out of our elements you create lilies and roses."

Kahlil Gibran

Recommeded book
five stars
The Treasured Writings of Kahlil Gibran

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Some for the Glories of This World; and some
Sigh for the Phophet`s Paradise to come:
Ah, take the Cash, and let the Promise go,
Nor heed the rumble of the distant Drum!"


"Come, fill the Cup, and in the fire of Spring
Your winter- garment of Repentance fling:
The Bird of Time had but a little way
To flutter-and the Bird is on the Wing."


The Moving Finger writes; and, having writ,
Moves on: nor all thy Piety nor Wit
Shall lure it back to cancel half a Line,
Nor all thy Tears wash out a Word of it.


"Ah, Love! could you and I with Fate conspire
To Grasp this sorry Scheme of Things entire,
Would not we shatter it to bits-and then
Remould it nearer to the heart`s desire!"
Written 1120 A.C.E

Omar Khayyam

Recommeded book
five stars
Rubaiyat Of Omar Khayyam

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The quality of mercy is not strain'd
It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven
Upon the place beneath: It is twice bless'd;
It blesseth him that gives and him that takes:
'Tis mightiest in the mightiest; it becomes
The crowned monarch better than his crown;
His sceptre shows the force of temporal power,
The attribute to awe and majesty,
Wherein doth sit the dread and fear of kings;
But mercy is above this sceptred sway,
It is enthroned in the hearts of kings,
It is an attribute to God himself,
And earthly power doth then show likest God's
When mercy seasons justice.
Act 4, scene 1, 180–193 (The Merchant Of Venice)


Our revels now are ended. These our actors,
As I foretold you, were all spirits, and
Are melted into air, into thin air:
The cloud-capp`d towers, the gorgeous palaces,
The solemn temples, the great globe itself,
Yea, all which it inherits, shall dissolve,
And, like this unsubstantial pageant faded,
Leave not a rack behind. We are such stuff
As dreams are made on; and our little life
Is rounded with a sleep."
Act iv. Sc.1. (The Tempest)


I, thus neglecting worldly ends, all dedicated
To closeness and the bettering of my mind.
 The Tempest. Act i. Sc. 2.

William Shakespeare

Allen Cohen Poetry
60's Poet/Editor/Teacher/Visionary

MORE POETRY LINKS

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